2018 Conference – Winchester

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About The Event

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WHERE

Fort Mason Center
San Fancisco, CA

WHEN

Sunday to Wednesday
July 23 to 26, 2017


The New Era of Tech Companies

Drawing thousands of the world's technology leaders together to learn and do business,

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We have top executive & start up here

Drawing thousands of the world's technology leaders together to learn and do business,

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Hurry Up!

Last year our tickets sold fast so don’t miss. Conference will start in

Conference Schedule

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  • Day 1 - Thursday 7th June, 2018

    Join us for our associate and new tutor/early career researcher workshops. This is followed by our opening conference debate before heading out to eat in Winchester at the conference dinner.

  • Writing for publication is a challenging process for any new tutor joining universities. Learn about the features of a good presentation and what your audience is looking for. How to transfer this to the development of a publication as well as general advice for early career researchers.
    Early Career Researcher
    New Tutors
    Where
    SAB204

  • Join our opening debate with edtech book authors and contributors from the first ‘What the research says’ book, including ITTE and MirandaNet members. This debate is formed of a panel who will provide an introduction to the question outlined above exploring our knowledge surrounding edtech. The audience will then be invited to contribute and engage in an interactive way. The Enhancing Learning and Teaching with Technology books edited by Rose Luckin will be on sale with 20% discount Chaired by Dr Chris Shelton, University of Chichester.
    Conference Debate
    Where
    SAB204

  • Day 2 - Friday 8th June, 2018

    Welcome to our 'Raising Aspirations for Digital Education' Conference. Here you will find the complete schedule of the day.

  • Welcome to a whole day of conference activities. Enjoy a quick refreshment before the day begins and enjoy the surroundings of the West Downs Campus. A short introduction to the day, housekeeping and how to find your way around the conference facilities will be provided. Explore the resources demonstrated by the associate companies.
    Housekeeping
    Where
    Main Lecture room - West Downs 2

  • Research or Practice Paper Main Lecture room - West Downs 2 Chair: Andy Connell Time 9.35 - 10.35 This session will consider the following questions: 1. How should young children learn about technology? 2. What should we be doing to ensure firm foundations for Computing in Key Stage One and Beyond? Raising Aspirations in Technology in the Early Years Technology in Early Childhood is a contentious issue. Some see technology as potentially harmful to young children (House, 2012). Whereas, others stress the need for positive experiences with technology from a young age in order to prepare children to thrive within an increasingly technology driven society (Plowman, McPake & Stephen, 2012; Morgan & Siraj-Blatchford, 2013). In 2014, a new Computing curriculum became statutory for local authority maintained schools in England. This curriculum is taught from Key Stage One (from the age of five onwards). This paper explores best practice approaches to early childhood education; calling for playful, imaginative and creative uses of technology that encourage collaboration and communication. In addition, the session will explore what should be done within Early Childhood practice to ensure firm foundations for the subject of computing in Key Stage One and beyond.
    Workshop 1a
    Where
    Main Lecture room - West Downs 2

  • This presentation is concerned with the digital skills needed by practitioners for the teaching of and with new technologies; specifically for the pedagogy of VR filming. Drawing upon experiences in the teaching of a dozen young people in the creation of three Virtual Reality (VR) films during a BFI project, this presentation explores whether traditional teaching paradigms hold an anachronistic existence within the digital world of technology. This is done by considering Rancière’s theoretical stance and whether it might be suggestive of a paradigm for the digital citizenship of young people which embraces the concept of meeting expectations instead of raising them.
    Workshop 1a
    Where
    Main Lecture room - West Downs 2

  • In September 2014 the new National Curriculum programmes of study for Computing became mandatory in England, replacing Information and Communications Technology (ICT) as a school subject and introducing Computer Science into schools. The new curriculum posed a challenge for in-service ICT teachers without Computer Science subject knowledge: teachers urgently needed to develop both subject and pedagogical knowledge to make the transition from teaching ICT to teaching Computing. Using an extended version of Shulman’s pedagogical reasoning model, this paper uses an empirically-driven theoretical critique to examine the opportunities and limitations of PCK for understanding how a group of teachers making the transition to teaching Computing have been able to plan lessons aligning with the new programmes of study.
    Workshop 1a
    Where
    Main Lecture room - West Downs 2

  • Greater Manchester Digital Talent Pipeline Programme The programme will build links between education, informal learning & industry delivering short, medium and long term solutions to the digital talent shortage. The outcomes we need to see are; young people inspired to enter careers in digital/tech, teachers supported to deliver the computing curriculum in an interesting & industry relevant way and all young people building up their work readiness and the right digital, creative and broader business skills. The programme will operate at scale across GM working with schools & colleges across GM – we want an offer that is open to all but there will need to be some targeting to ensure we deliver the maximum social and economic impact possible. It will make it easy for industry to get involved with education in a way that is strategic and relevant to their talent pipeline. Research - Extensive local and national research was gathered on the digital talent shortage included reports from the GM LEP, GMCA, Manchester Digital and HM Govnt Industrial Strategy. Research included key shortages in the local, digital sector from software development, data analysis through to cyber security and testing. Future employer demand was also identified including AI, machine learning and IOT. Consultation • A small group of schools in Greater Manchester were engaged to understand their drivers and challenges around the delivery of the computing curriculum, careers and work placements and the support they would like to access. • A small group of digital/tech employers were engaged individually and as a group to understand what expertise they can offer to education & support requirements. • A group of GM organisations currently involved in promoting the digital agenda were also consulted to find out what is working well and at scale. This group included Manchester Digital, HIVE Manchester, InnovateHer and Stepping into Business.
    Workshop 1a
    Where
    Main Lecture room - West Downs 2

  • West Downs 9 Chair: Terry Freedman Time 9.35 - 10.35 What digital skills teachers need and how to make full use of digital tools across the curriculum are not separate agendas - they are inextricably linked. The theory of affordance, or what objects in the world provide or furnish for us, suggests that the needs of individual educators directly drive which digital tools are most appropriate for their use in any single context. This session will report on an ongoing initiative, currently being trialled in schools, that has produced a series of tools and techniques to help educators discover which digital tools are most appropriate for their needs. By first discovering their own level of TPK, or Technological Pedagogical Knowledge, mapped against six dimensions of teaching and learning, teachers can plan not only for ways in which to develop their digital skills but also discover the most appropriate, or apt, digital tools to suit that development. Based on doctoral work at the University of Exeter, the underlying APT methodology will be described and presented, along with the TPK quiz, dimensions models of teaching practice and Tech Trumps which describe the affordance of digital apps. Attendees are encouraged to critique the approach, offer suggestions as to ways in which the APT methodology might be trialled further in schools, and discuss how this approach might raise aspirations for digital education.
    Workshop 1b
    Where
    West Downs 9

  • Raising aspirations for digital education amongst school pupils and students: coding in the Czech Republic Dr Bozena Mannova, MirandaNet Council, chair of Czech Miranda, Czech Technical University in Prague. The Czech Miranda, an Anglo-Czech alliance, was set up in 1994 and MirandaNet members have been involved in a range of activities that illustrate how the learning journey from school pupil to university undergraduate has been greatly facilitated in Prague. In the Czech Republic coding has been taught since the 1990s. However, with the availability of advanced personal computers in the 1990’s the educational activities were oriented towards mastering software products like MS Word, Excel and other well-known applications as it did in the UK. The teaching of coding lost its importance for a time as the educational focus moved to Computer Applications. In the last few years we have seen a renaissance of teaching programming on a large scale both for school pupils and for students. Besides what is teaching at school in frame of course Informatics, there are many activities in the Czech Republic where school pupils and students are attracted to programming. Much is done in schools in cooperation with Universities and CTU in Prague is strongly involved in it. Courses in coding for school pupils are taught also by university students with the support of universities. For example, there is a group of girl students at the Czech technical University in Prague (CTU) who teaches courses for children from elementary and secondary schools. The results are excellent and the project proves that this type of lessons can be implemented into standard teaching at schools. Activities, where school pupils are now exposed to basics of programming, are developing well. Several platforms which support teaching of programming for schools and students are used at CTU. The presentation will explain how the pupils respond to this program.
    Workshop 1b
    Where
    West Downs 9

  • Cybersecuring the future Authors: Lynne Dagg, Sheila Garfield and Steven Haswell, University of Sunderland Computer Science Teachers work within a time of profound technological change which impacts on the curriculum they are asked to deliver. One such area is CyberSecurity. The aim of this research was to consider how aware students and teachers are about the topic of CyberSecurity and to gain an insight into where teachers felt they required training and where pupils would benefit from greater understanding. This was a small scale study which was conducted using two online surveys. The first survey was aimed at University students of Computing including some who were undertaking Teacher Training Programs. The second was directly aimed at teachers. The first questions were similar between the two surveys although additional questions were asked to teachers relating to their teaching, their learning and the learning of their students. Although the response size was small there were a number of interesting findings particularly relating to their practices of utilising security measures in their own contexts. The study is important because it allows future consideration about two areas. Firstly the question why those who are generally more informed than the general public would not always comply with good practice when dealing with matters relating to passwords and digital footprint outside the educational context. Secondly, the study provides an insight into where teachers may require additional training relating to CyberSecurity and methods through which this may be effected.
    Workshop 1b
    Where
    West Downs 9

  • Mathematics teachers today face a kaleidoscope of software and hardware options that is sadly leading the majority to use none of it. Furthermore serious lack of training and the complicated use of some open-source titles are leading a whole generation of students to miss out on the educational benefits of digital resources in their Mathematics. Mathematics teachers use ICT more intensely than other subjects, so it is vital that any school-wide solution takes this into account – in particular it is quite common, and far from ideal, to force a mathematics department to use only tablets.
    Workshop 1b
    Where
    West Downs 9

  • Join a lively debate with a panel of speakers who will be debating the best ways to support EdTech Teacher Training and CPD. This debate is formed of a panel who will provide an introduction to the question outlined and then audience will then be invited to contribute and engage in an interactive way. Chaired by Professor Sarah Younie, Journal Editor, Technology, Pedagogy & Education.
    Conference Debate
    Where
    Main Lecture room - West Downs 2

  • Keynote Presentation – Amelia Walker ‘What does our research tell us about the curriculum in schools?’ ‘What does our research tell us about the curriculum in schools?’ Over the past year we have conducted extensive research on the curriculum in primary schools. These findings will inform how Ofsted inspects from 2019 onwards. Here is a summary: Last year we published a commentary from HMCI on our findings from our research on the curriculum in primary and secondary schools. We have continued to investigate this topic this year, and this is feeding into Ofsted’s thinking about how we will inspect from 2019 onwards. In this session I will reflect on our findings to date and give an insight into the areas of focus that are driving our current approach. One of the issues we are interested in is how inspections can assess performance in different subject areas, while preserving the important principle that Ofsted does not have a preferred curriculum.
    Keynote
    Where
    Main Lecture room - West Downs 2

Our Speakers

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Location

Grand Conference Hall - 881 7th Ave New York, NY

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